K. Ullas Karanth’s Remarkable Keynote Address

Dr. K. Ullas Karanth, Director – CWS, was chosen to make the keynote address at the 2018 Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Annual Conference held in Seattle.

In a speech that had humour and impact in equal measures, Dr. Karanth emphasized to an auditorium of zoo and aquarium professionals how their support of field conservation is making a tangible difference for wildlife and wild places.

Walking the audience through a lifetime of conservation and science work, he drew the most laughs when he mentioned “…and I became instantly unpopular… ’cause I was saying that the emperor has no clothes”

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Krithi Karanth’s Compelling Talk at NiF 2018

We are happy to share with you, Chief Conservation Scientist – CWS, Dr. Krithi K. Karanth’s impassioned talk on “Rewilding India” at the 2018 Nature-in-Focus Festival held in Bangalore.

Dr. Karanth acknowledged that, “All the research, all the science, all the publications don’t make a difference if you are unable to change reality!”. Through vivid examples drawn from 20 years of conservation and current CWS programs, she insisted that despite the many challenges facing wildlife conservation in India today, there was more than enough reason for hope and optimism. 

When we can celebrate the cultural diversity of India with such gusto, she asked, why not celebrate the richness of our natural wealth as well?

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Conservation must be guided by science

Dr. K. Ullas Karanth was approached by the BBC for his comments on the recent human-tiger conflict incident much in the news in India. He stressed on the importance of the application of solid science and practical considerations. The article looks at the history of tiger conservation in India and at the recent increase number … Read moreConservation must be guided by science

Tech goes back to basics to mitigate human-wildlife conflict near Indian parks

A simple user-friendly mobile phone system has helped villagers near two Indian national parks report crop and livestock damages to authorities and receive appropriate compensation. Such damages can lead to the retaliatory killing of animals, whereas compensation can help foster tolerance of wildlife even in densely populated regions. The mobile technology used by the Wild … Read moreTech goes back to basics to mitigate human-wildlife conflict near Indian parks

The Hindu: Big cats, cow-dung, and changing rural economies?

Fluctuating coffee prices, lower demand for cow dung as manure and increasing foreign cattle varieties may be part of the changing local economy, fuelling man-carnivore conflict around Bandipur Tiger Reserve. In the centre of this could be the replacement of native cows with the more expensive “hybrid” cattle, note researchers Jared D. Margulies from the University of … Read moreThe Hindu: Big cats, cow-dung, and changing rural economies?

Scientific American blog by Dr. K. Ullas Karanth

This article by Dr. Ullas Karanth in the Scientific American talks about evaluating where we are headed in the strenuous effort to recover this icon of nature’s diversity. Global efforts targeting tiger recovery began in the 1960’s. All the putative “wild tiger numbers” touted along the way (4000-5000 animals), however, are either glorified guesses or conjured … Read moreScientific American blog by Dr. K. Ullas Karanth

Big Cat Comeback: How India Is Restoring Its Tiger Population

  Dr. K. Ullas Karanth, Director – CWS, has spent a half-century working to protect India’s endangered tigers. In an interview with Yale e360, he argues that with smart planning and the cooperation of its rural residents, the country could support five times the number of tigers it has now. He talks of the time when he began … Read moreBig Cat Comeback: How India Is Restoring Its Tiger Population

9 human-animal conflicts every day in Bandipore, Nagarhole National Park

In the last three years, Bandipore National Park and Nagarhole National Park in Karnataka have recorded 10,000 instances of human-animal conflict, shows data from the Wild Seve programme by an international wildlife non-profit, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). This translates into 9 human-animal conflicts per day on an average. Click here to read the full … Read more9 human-animal conflicts every day in Bandipore, Nagarhole National Park

Wild Seve files its 10,000th claim

Late on July 8, on the fringes of Bandipur National Park, a farmer in Shivapura village heard noises from his livestock shed. Moments later, he spotted a black panther holding a calf by its neck. Seeing the gathering crowd, the leopard ran away, leaving behind its victim. There was no anger nor were there calls … Read moreWild Seve files its 10,000th claim

Garden Pests that Can Eat You: WCS Wild Seve Program Protects Farmers and Wildlife from Each Other

WCS’s Wild Seve program, which helps farmers living around India’s Bandipur and Nagarahole National Parks recoup losses of crops or livestock from tigers, leopards, elephants, and other protected wildlife, has just filed its 10,000th claim since the program launched in July, 2015. In doing so, Wild Seve has potentially saved wildlife from being slaughtered in … Read moreGarden Pests that Can Eat You: WCS Wild Seve Program Protects Farmers and Wildlife from Each Other